Quantcast

Internet users seeking more ‘invisibility’—study



AP FILE PHOTO

SINGAPORE—Consumer efforts to protect personal data and remain “invisible” online is leading to a “data blackhole” that could adversely impact digital advertisers, technology research firm Ovum said Wednesday.

The move to seek “new tools that allow them to remain ‘invisible’ — untraceable and impossible to target by data means” will impact advertisers who rely on that information to target their audiences, Ovum said.

Surveying consumers in 11 countries around the world, the research firm said 68 percent of respondents said they would select a “do not track” feature if this was easily available.

“This hardening of consumer attitudes, coupled with tightening regulation, could diminish personal data supply lines and have considerable impact on targeted advertising, customer relationship management, big data analytics and other digital industries,” the London-based firm said in a statement.

Mark Little, a principal analyst at Ovum, said Internet users were increasingly getting more access to new tools to “monitor, control and secure their personal data as never before”.

The recent scandal involving privacy breaches by mobile messaging service WhatsApp and lingering concerns over data use policies on Facebook and Google are prompting Internet users to be more guarded, Ovum added.

A joint Canadian-Dutch probe concluded last month that WhatsApp breached privacy laws in at least two countries “mainly in relation to the retention, safeguard, and disclosure of personal data”.

The joint probe found that most mobile smartphone users did not have a choice to use WhatsApp’s messaging app without granting access to their entire address book, in violation of Canadian and Dutch privacy laws.








Recent Stories:

‘Shrilling chicken’ is cute but very dangerous, says toxic watch group 2 mins elapsed Zamboanga Sibugay businessman’s daughter kidnapped 28 mins elapsed PH bans new worker deployments in 3 countries 32 mins elapsed Why online retail is the next big thing in e-Commerce 33 mins elapsed EU’s Catherine Ashton to visit Philippines Monday 49 mins elapsed Fallen tree ties up traffic on major Cebu provincial artery 2 hours elapsed Air Algerie crash wipes out entire families 4 hours elapsed NBA: Lakers mum on report Scott offered coaching job 4 hours elapsed
Complete stories on our Digital Edition newsstand for tablets, netbooks and mobile phones; 14-issue free trial. About to step out? Get breaking alerts on your mobile.phone. Text ON INQ BREAKING to 4467, for Globe, Smart and Sun subscribers in the Philippines.



Copyright © 2014, .
To subscribe to the Philippine Daily Inquirer newspaper in the Philippines, call +63 2 896-6000 for Metro Manila and Metro Cebu or email your subscription request here.
Factual errors? Contact the Philippine Daily Inquirer's day desk. Believe this article violates journalistic ethics? Contact the Inquirer's Reader's Advocate. Or write The Readers' Advocate:
c/o Philippine Daily Inquirer Chino Roces Avenue corner Yague and Mascardo Streets, Makati City, Metro Manila, Philippines Or fax nos. +63 2 8974793 to 94
Advertisement Advertisement
Advertisement
Marketplace