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Good friends mimic each other’s brainwaves, neuroscientist claims

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Good friends mimic each other’s brainwaves, neuroscientist claims

/ 04:00 PM November 11, 2017

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Ever wonder why your close friends often share the same train of thought that you do?

Professor Moran Cerf from Northwestern University in Illinois, United States credits this to science, as he claims that humans mimic the brainwaves of people they spend the most time with.

According to the renowned neuroscientist, a group of friends who are literally “on the same wavelength” are much more satisfied than those who are not; they also often achieve long-term happiness in life.

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“The more we study engagement, we see time and again that just being next to certain people actually aligns your brain with them,” he was quoted as saying in a Business Insider report.

“This means the people you hang out with actually have an impact on your engagement with reality beyond what you can explain. And one of the effects is you become alike,” he shared.

Dr. Cerf also warned the public to carefully choose who they align themselves with, since it may also influence a person’s decision-making abilities.

His findings correlate with a study by researchers from New York University and Utrecht University last April, which suggested that brainwaves sync up with their colleagues at work. Khristian Ibarrola/JB

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TAGS: brainwaves, Northwestern University, Professor Moran Cerf, wavelength
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