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US government tells computer users to disable Java



WASHINGTON—The US Department of Homeland Security is advising people to temporarily disable the Java software on their computers to avoid potential hacking attacks.

The recommendation came in an advisory issued late Thursday, following up on concerns raised by computer security experts.

Experts believe hackers have found a flaw in Java’s coding that creates an opening for criminal activity and other high-tech mischief.

Java is a widely used technical language that allows computer programmers to write a wide variety of Internet applications and other software programs that can run on just about any computer’s operating system.

Oracle Corp. bought Java as part of a $7.3 billion acquisition of the software’s creator, Sun Microsystems, in 2010.

Oracle, which is based in Redwood Shores, California, had no immediate comment late Friday.








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  • Garote

    I would rather see the US Dept. of Homeland Security being dissolved than to see the Java software disabled. The Homeland Security has been acting like Mafia hoodlums deliberately violating the civil rights of US citizens, treating them like convicts. We see illegal arrest of US citizens without legal basis to do so; we see illegal surveillance being conducted without court orders; we see check points put up to restrict and harass citizens’ movements to acclimatize them to a police state in US.

  • hklt0110

    time to disable the system..



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