Quantcast
Latest Stories

Web pioneers win inaugural $1.5M engineering prize



Lord Browne, left, chair of QEPrize Foundation, announces the winners of the inaugural Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering, French Software Engineer Louis Pouzin, right, and US Internet Pioneer Robert Kahn, center, at the Royal Academy of Engineering in London on Monday, March 18, 2013. Five pioneering engineers, US Robert Kahn, US Vinton Cerf, French Louis Pouzin, British Tim Berners-Lee and US Marc Andreessen, share this first prize. SANG TAN/AP IMAGES FOR QEPRIZE)

LONDON—Five engineers who helped create the Internet were on Monday awarded a $1.5 million prize which British organizers hope will come to be seen as equivalent to a Nobel prize for engineering.

Robert Kahn, Vinton Cerf and Marc Andreessen of the United States will share the first ever £1 million (1.2 million euro) Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering with Louis Pouzin of France and Tim Berners-Lee of Britain.

“The emergence of the Internet and the web involved many teams of people all over the world,” said Alec Broers, chair of the judging panel.

“However, these five visionary engineers, never before honored together as a group, led the key developments that shaped the Internet and web as a coherent system and brought them into public use.”

Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II, who gives her name to the prize, will present the award to the winners in a formal ceremony in London in June.

Organizers said Kahn, Cerf and Pouzin had made “seminal” contributions to the design and protocols that make up the fundamental architecture of the Internet.

Berners-Lee invented the World Wide Web, the information-sharing system built on top of the Internet which allows us to use it in the way we do today.

Andreessen, meanwhile, created the first widely used web browser, Mosaic.

Microsoft founder Bill Gates was among those who pushed for the inaugural prize to be granted to Internet pioneers.

“It would be difficult to point to any significant human endeavor that has not been touched profoundly through the invention and deployment of the Internet,” he said.

“We are living today in only the beginning of the transformations that will come through this enabling technology.”

Around a third of the world’s population use the Internet today, according to UN figures.

The Queen Elizabeth Prize was created last year in a bid to boost the industry’s profile and give greater recognition to the revolutionary impact it has on people’s lives.

“Engineers are often the unsung heroes whose innovations have made phenomenal contributions to society,” said the award’s director Anji Hunter.

“We need more skilled engineers to solve the world’s most pressing problems, which require not only excellent education and inspirational role models, but more attention focused on highlighting the wonders of modern engineering, wherever they may be,” she added.


Follow us on Facebook Follow on Twitter Follow on Twitter




Recent Stories:

Plane lands at Bali airport in suspected hijacking—Indonesia air force 14 mins elapsed Guiao fined P100,000 for ‘mongoloid’ comment vs Meralco forward 24 mins elapsed Obama lands in Seoul as N. Korea nuclear test fears grow 28 mins elapsed Businesswoman allegedly killed by husband, brother-in-law 32 mins elapsed Roxas suspended from golf club for outburst over P5,000 guest fee 36 mins elapsed SC reschedules oath-taking of new lawyers 54 mins elapsed Hawks and Grizzlies revel in home wins 1 hour elapsed Militant protests vs Obama, US set 1 hour elapsed
Complete stories on our Digital Edition newsstand for tablets, netbooks and mobile phones; 14-issue free trial. About to step out? Get breaking alerts on your mobile.phone. Text ON INQ BREAKING to 4467, for Globe, Smart and Sun subscribers in the Philippines.

Tags: Awards and Prizes , Britain , Engineering , Internet , Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering , technology

  • Mux

    “We need more skilled engineers to solve the world’s most pressing
    problems, which require not only excellent education and inspirational
    role models, but more attention focused on highlighting the wonders of
    modern engineering, wherever they may be,” she added.

    Read that Sheldon?

  • riza888

    “This is like waking up from a really exciting dream and discovering the geeks are winning!” – Vinton Cerf

    Excellent quote. Let’s hope so!

  • WeAry_Bat

    In the Internet boom of the Philippines, the browser of choice was Netscape, descendant of Mosaic. The multimedia possibilities of the Internet was tremendous, every company on the US wanted in on the action. Although the joke was, and there is some truth to it, the WWW popularity was driven by pron.

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/Q2EFFJUNBLYFKXTUS6CZEA6GVA Waldy

    bill gates should give them at least100 million dollars each, without themm there would be no WINDOWS at all

    • foreignerph

      Your timeline is wrong. Mosaic/Netscape became only available to the large public around 1995 when Windows was already at its 4-th version (Windows 95).

  • UrHONOR

    MODERN HEROES!!!



Copyright © 2014,
.
To subscribe to the Philippine Daily Inquirer newspaper in the Philippines, call +63 2 896-6000 for Metro Manila and Metro Cebu or email your subscription request here.
Factual errors? Contact the Philippine Daily Inquirer's day desk. Believe this article violates journalistic ethics? Contact the Inquirer's Reader's Advocate. Or write The Readers' Advocate:
c/o Philippine Daily Inquirer Chino Roces Avenue corner Yague and Mascardo Streets, Makati City, Metro Manila, Philippines Or fax nos. +63 2 8974793 to 94
Advertisement Advertisement
  1. Enrile in Masters of the Universe, Lord of the Rings?
  2. Vatican announces hashtag for April 27 canonizations
  3. Mark Caguioa lambasts Ginebra teammates on Twitter
  4. Nokia to be named Microsoft Mobile
  5. ‘Unlimited’ Internet promos not really limitless; lawmakers call for probe
  6. No truth to viral no-visa ‘chronicles’
  7. Viber releases new design for iPhone, comes to Blackberry 10 for the first time
  8. PH has slowest internet in Southeast Asia
  9. Senator wants to probe PH slow Internet connection
  10. Philippines has slowest, poorest mobile LTE connection, says report
  1. Mark Caguioa lambasts Ginebra teammates on Twitter
  2. PH has slowest internet in Southeast Asia
  3. Senator wants to probe PH slow Internet connection
  4. Enrile in Masters of the Universe, Lord of the Rings?
  5. Nokia to be named Microsoft Mobile
  6. Did Deniece Cornejo lambast Vhong Navarro on social media?
  7. Netizens seethe over Aquino’s ‘sacrifice’ message
  8. ‘Unlimited’ Internet promos not really limitless; lawmakers call for probe
  9. Facebook rolls out ‘nearby friends’ feature
  10. Nasa’s moon-orbiting robot crashes down
  1. #RejectedBbPilipinas2014Questions flood Twitter
  2. Did Deniece Cornejo lambast Vhong Navarro on social media?
  3. Netizens fall in love with Crimea prosecutor Natalia Poklonskaya
  4. Mommy Dionisia Pacquiao scores, takes over social media
  5. Nude and so dangerous
  6. Mark Caguioa lambasts Ginebra teammates on Twitter
  7. Mommy Dionisia sings ‘Riking Bull,’sends netizens ablaze
  8. PH has slowest internet in Southeast Asia
  9. Russia tries to curb Crimean prosecutor’s Internet fame
  10. Memes flourish after Pacquiao victory

News

  • Businesswoman allegedly killed by husband, brother-in-law
  • Roxas suspended from golf club for outburst over P5,000 guest fee
  • SC reschedules oath-taking of new lawyers
  • Ex-COA chief seeks bail after arrest for plunder
  • Aquino expects more from new Air Force chief ‘since I know him so well’
  • Sports

  • Guiao fined P100,000 for ‘mongoloid’ comment vs Meralco forward
  • Hawks and Grizzlies revel in home wins
  • Floyd: Manny’s power gone
  • Michael Phelps loses to Lochte in comeback meet
  • Sharapova advances to Stuttgart quarterfinals
  • Lifestyle

  • ‘Recovered’ Banksy works on display ahead of sale
  • Marinduque: Visiting the ‘palm of the ocean’
  • First at Vatican in 60 years
  • How Jing Monis Salon gave Krissy the pixie
  • Want to be a supermodel? Work on your inner beauty, says Joey Espino
  • Entertainment

  • Paul McCartney to play at Candlestick concert
  • Kristoffer Martin: from thug to gay teen
  • Has Ai Ai fallen deeply with ‘sireno?’
  • California court won’t review Jackson doctor case
  • Cris Villonco on play adapted from different medium
  • Business

  • PAL hailed for ban on shark fin cargo
  • BSP to change tint of P100 bill
  • Nielsen sees car buying boom in the Philippines
  • How author of best-seller exposed ‘one percent’ economic elite
  • Bangko Sentral readies new bank lending rules
  • Technology

  • Cloud strength helps Microsoft earnings top Street
  • Vatican announces hashtag for April 27 canonizations
  • Enrile in Masters of the Universe, Lord of the Rings?
  • Top Traits of Digital Marketers
  • No truth to viral no-visa ‘chronicles’
  • Opinion

  • Corruption not invincible after all
  • Editorial Cartoon, April 25, 2014
  • No deal, Janet
  • Like making Al Capone a witness vs his gang
  • MERS-CoV and mothers
  • Global Nation

  • Plane lands at Bali airport in suspected hijacking—Indonesia air force
  • Obama lands in Seoul as N. Korea nuclear test fears grow
  • Militant protests vs Obama, US set
  • Filipinos second-shortest in Southeast Asia
  • China welcomes PH apology
  • Advertisement
    Marketplace