Quantcast

CAUSE OF DROPPED CALLS

Vendor of illegal telecom devices busted in Manila



A man was recently arrested in Sta. Ana, Manila, for allegedly selling illegal telecommunication devices in a buy-bust operation initiated by Globe Telecom and antifraud operatives.

Caught during the entrapment was Mark Lewis Teng Chua, who faces charges for violating the Access Device Regulation Act of 1998.

Chua was arrested following a test buy of a signal booster-repeater in his store. Upon verification with the National Telecommunications Commission (NTC), it was learned that the equipment was not approved by the agency and that the company which sells it is not authorized to do so.

A Globe Security antifraud operative posed as buyer. Chua was brought to Camp Bagong Diwa, Taguig City, for investigation.

Illegal repeaters cause network interference since they are not calibrated properly, causing cell-phone subscribers to experience dropped calls, garbled lines and weak signals, according to a statement from the telecom company.

They come in the form of indoor or outdoor antennas and wireless adapters which boost network coverage and signals by hogging bandwidth from a legitimate network infrastructure.

“The use of illegal repeaters to get good network coverage at the expense of others is a totally unfair practice, especially as it impacts a great majority of subscribers in an identified area,” said Froilan M. Castelo, Globe Corporate and Legal Services Group head.

“With our strengthened partnerships with the police, courts and other government institutions like the NTC, Globe will remain relentless in going after and prosecuting perpetrators,” Castelo said.








Recent Stories:

BIR collections rose by 8.01% in August 9 mins elapsed Builder defends Torre de Manila vs ‘photoshopped’ complaints 12 mins elapsed Billy Crawford arraigned on mischief charge 19 mins elapsed Mayon threatens eruption, lures tourists 2 hours elapsed EU, PH back peaceful resolution of sea row 2 hours elapsed Aquino to Euro investors: ‘Contribute to rise of Asia’s next tiger’ 3 hours elapsed Asian shares slip ahead of US Fed decision 3 hours elapsed 4 dead in Luzon as ‘Luis’ leaves PH 3 hours elapsed
Complete stories on our Digital Edition newsstand for tablets, netbooks and mobile phones; 14-issue free trial. About to step out? Get breaking alerts on your mobile.phone. Text ON INQ BREAKING to 4467, for Globe, Smart and Sun subscribers in the Philippines.




  • Mux

    How different is this from buying a water pump and installing it so that more water gets sucked in the house or building thus depriving the neighbors of water? However I’ve never heard of MWSS busting anybody for an illegal water pump. Illegal connection yes.

  • Guest

    Mahaba-habang usapan ito.

    Under normal circumstances, signal boosters or repeaters should not be allowed. Normal circumstances mean when Globe promises you 2mbps, you should have 2mbps in speed. Consistently 2mbps, not just burstable speed, not just maximum bandwidth, but really really really 2mbps all the time every time. Unfortunately in the Philippines, getting the real speed consumers paid for is more of the exemption rather than the norm. If you have a 2mbps account with Globe, chances are you will only get 1mbps normally the entire day. You have to wait until 1 or 2 in the morning to really hit 2mbps, when nobody else around your vicinity are using the internet. Wimax or DSL, same thing. Simply put, congested palagi ang network ng Globe. Congested because Globe took in more customers than they could handle, and now nabubulunan ang Globe network infrastructure. Globe has a serious problem with network capacity planning and network infrastructure upgrade. (enjoy your semana santa with Globe, take note of choke points along NLEX and SLEX exits from NCR).

    Ang problema, why is NTC not exposing Globe’s inadequacies and demanding Globe to refund all its customers? The simple answer is walang pera kikitain ang NTC in exposing the full measure of deception of Globe. By looking the other way, by turning a blind eye, by accepting lagay, that’s how NTC makes money. At least the top dawgs in NTC. Di hamak na mas malaki ang babayaran ng Globe kung mauwi sa refund ang usapan. Mas mura ang maglagay sa NTC. (Compelling Globe to refund is like compelling Meralco to refund excess charges. Malaki-laki ang nakulimbat ng Globe, malaki-laki din ang i-rerefund nila).

    Now that we know things are not normal in the Philippines for telco subscribers and consumers, sino ang dehado? Kung dehado ang consumers, that’s when consumers start thinking of remedying the situation by acquiring repeaters and boosters. Signal boosters and repeaters are available even in sulitdotcom. Huawei and ZTE have made them even more affordable with the same power as other foreign brands.

    The bottomline is = why not solve the problem by making sure that telcos deliver what they promise? If the the telcos deliver the speed and smooth connectivity that they promise, the market for signal boosters and repeaters will shrink dramatically.

    Whichever way you look at it, the telco duopoly always emerges the winner. Konting ambon sa NTC. Ang palaging talo ay ang Filipino consumers.

    • kismaytami

      Not only Globe, but all residential ISPs are guilty of false marketing. We really need to allow foreign telcos in the country to bankrupt these incompetent greedy local telcos.

  • go88

    Mark Lewis ‘Teng Chua’ … as usual …. another ‘taipan’ (in the making) wo will, with help of the hard work, ‘honesty’ and ‘integrity’ behos are known for, build a business empire in our country?

    • http://twitter.com/Fieldwarp Fieldwarp

      @go88.. Mr. Mark won’t need to sell those stuffs if only our telco provides reliable service. they are the ones you need to ask honesty and integrity…. are you really getting the quality of service you paid for?? people resort to acquiring those remedies because of the poor and terrible service provided by the telcos protected by the NTC.



Copyright © 2014, .
To subscribe to the Philippine Daily Inquirer newspaper in the Philippines, call +63 2 896-6000 for Metro Manila and Metro Cebu or email your subscription request here.
Factual errors? Contact the Philippine Daily Inquirer's day desk. Believe this article violates journalistic ethics? Contact the Inquirer's Reader's Advocate. Or write The Readers' Advocate:
c/o Philippine Daily Inquirer Chino Roces Avenue corner Yague and Mascardo Streets, Makati City, Metro Manila, Philippines Or fax nos. +63 2 8974793 to 94
Advertisement Advertisement
Advertisement
Marketplace