AI Legal Assistant Cancels Planned Stunt [Updated] | Inquirer Technology

AI Legal Assistant Cancels Stunt Due To State Bar Prosecutors [Updated]

02:26 PM January 11, 2023

Have you ever thought about artificial intelligence defending you in court? A company was going to launch a real legal assistant in court next month, but it had to cancel the stunt.

DoNotPay created “the world’s first robot lawyer,” an app designed to help a defendant fight a traffic ticket.

ADVERTISEMENT

It would have been an important milestone for AI development, and CEO Joshua Browder would have covered any fines. However, prosecutors changed his mind.

What did DoNotPay plan with the AI legal assistant?

This represents the DoNotPay AI legal assistant.

Photo Credit: nypost.com

DoNotPay started in 2015 as a chatbot that offers legal advice to people dealing with late fines or fees.

FEATURED STORIES

In 2020, it developed into an artificial intelligence powered by a mobile app. Recently, it planned to defend someone in court using the AI legal assistant.

The defendant would have a smartphone that runs the DoNotPay app. Also, he would be wearing an earpiece attached to that mobile device.

The app would listen to court arguments in real-time. Then, it would tell the defendant via the earpiece what to say.

According to the New York Post, the historic hearing will occur next month. However, DoNotPay did not disclose the court’s location or the defendant’s name.

CEO Joshua Browder says that robot lawyers could provide affordable legal assistance to low-income families.

He added it took a significant amount of time to train DoNotPay’s AI legal assistant. “We’re trying to minimize our legal liability,” Browder told the New York Post.

“And it’s not good if it actually twists facts and is too manipulative.” More importantly, he stated his ultimate goal to replace some lawyers with his app to save defendants money.

ADVERTISEMENT

Browder said, “It’s all about language, and that’s what lawyers charge hundreds or thousands of dollars an hour to do,”

He added, “…a lot of lawyers are just charging way too much money to copy and paste documents….”

“The goal of this company is to make the $200 billion legal profession free for consumers,” Browder said.

Unfortunately, DoNotPay’s CEO tweeted that he would not push through with the stunt because of threats from State Bar prosecutors.

Instead, Browder said his company would focus on defending consumer rights. DoNotPay would continue helping customers reduce medical bills, dispute credit reports, and cancel subscriptions.

Conclusion

DoNotPay decided not to test its AI legal assistant in a real court, so we would not see it in action soon. Nevertheless, other companies have been finding ways to incorporate artificial intelligence into the legal system.

For example, Kleros is a digital arbitration court system powered by blockchain technology. Also, the Chinese court system already uses AI for many purposes. 

Want to know more about how AI and other technologies are shaping our lives? Follow Inquirer Tech to learn more about that and other digital trends.

If you are interested in content marketing, please email [email protected] Updated on January 26, 2023.
Your subscription could not be saved. Please try again.
Your subscription has been successful.

Subscribe to our daily newsletter

By providing an email address. I agree to the Terms of Use and acknowledge that I have read the Privacy Policy.

TOPICS: AI, Artificial Intelligence, Court, Trending
Read Next
Don't miss out on the latest news and information.

Subscribe to INQUIRER PLUS to get access to The Philippine Daily Inquirer & other 70+ titles, share up to 5 gadgets, listen to the news, download as early as 4am & share articles on social media. Call 896 6000.

For feedback, complaints, or inquiries, contact us.
Your subscription could not be saved. Please try again.
Your subscription has been successful.

Subscribe to our technology news

By providing an email address. I agree to the Terms of Use and acknowledge that I have read the Privacy Policy.



© Copyright 1997-2023 INQUIRER.net | All Rights Reserved

We use cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. By continuing, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. To find out more, please click this link.