outbrain
Close  

WATCH: Japanese vlogger sings funny version of ‘Hayaan Mo Sila’ by EXB

/ 06:03 PM March 19, 2018

Japanese YouTube vlogger Fumiya Sankai rendered his own version of the song “Hayaan Mo Sila” by hip-hop collective Ex Battalion, at the request of his Filipino fans.

A regular visitor to the Philippines, Sankai started his little project by asking from his viewers suggestions on what Filipino songs to sing. Fans asked if he could sing “Hayaan Mo Sila”, and so he obliged.

ADVERTISEMENT

Sankia first filmed a trial video on March 6 where he attempted to sing while reading the lyrics from his mobile phone.

Given the nature of the song’s hip-hop arrangement, Sankai found it difficult to pronounce many of the words in time with the melody.

FEATURED STORIES

In the final video, Sankai could still be heard struggling to clearly enunciate words, suggesting he could use a little more time for practice.

Fans had a good laugh at the video and commended Sankai for the effort. Others said they hoped he could eventually learn to speak Tagalog fluently so he could sing better.

Image: YouTube/FumiShun BASE

Sankai also tried to sing “Titibo Tibo” by Moira Dela Torre in both Tagalog and Japanese.

The Japanese vlogger has taken an interest in Filipino pop culture. His more recent videos include trying out spicy Lucky Me Pancit Canton, eating in Jollibee and playing a game of pak ganern. JB

RELATED STORIES:

‘Wakanda’ searches peak on hotel booking site

WATCH: Jumbo lighter can light up more than just a cigar

ADVERTISEMENT

Therapy peacock denied airplane seat with owner

TOPICS: cover song, Ex Battalion, Fumiya Sankai, Hayaan Mo Sila, hiphop
Read Next
EDITORS' PICK
MOST READ
Don't miss out on the latest news and information.
View comments

Subscribe to INQUIRER PLUS to get access to The Philippine Daily Inquirer & other 70+ titles, share up to 5 gadgets, listen to the news, download as early as 4am & share articles on social media. Call 896 6000.

For feedback, complaints, or inquiries, contact us.


© Copyright 1997-2020 INQUIRER.net | All Rights Reserved

We use cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. By continuing, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. To find out more, please click this link.