Having a hard time putting up with colleagues? Try keeping a gratitude journal | Inquirer Technology
Close  

Having a hard time putting up with colleagues? Try keeping a gratitude journal

/ 04:13 PM October 01, 2020
journal

On completion of these exercises, participants were considerably less likely to report incidents of rudeness and ostracizing and gossipy behaviors in the workplace. Image: Alba Hurtado/Shutterstock

Under certain conditions, for example, when there is backbiting, rudeness, or ostracizing behavior, the atmosphere at work can be quite toxic. And given the current context marked by the health crisis and economic uncertainty, professional relationships are certainly coming under a lot of strain. But what can be done to reduce interpersonal tensions in the workplace? In a recent study, American researchers set out to see if positive thinking could help. For the purposes of the project, they asked workers to keep a gratitude journal.

After months of remote working, readjusting to office life is not always easy, particularly if the atmosphere is marked by disputes between colleagues and the nefarious influence of gossip. American researchers from the University of Central Florida set out to see if positive thinking could help with both of these. The technique they tested involved encouraging workers to keep a gratitude journal.

ADVERTISEMENT

Originally developed as an aid to personal development, keeping a gratitude journal involves taking a moment at the same time every day, often in the evening just before going to bed, to note some small things that brought us pleasure during the day. For example, these might include a compliment or a nice gesture from a friend (or even from a stranger), good news, an event that was enjoyable. The scale of emotion is not important, anything can be noted as long as it is positive.

According to the authors of the study, which was published in the Journal of Applied Psychology, the simple action of keeping a private journal of positive thoughts “can change your outlook, your approach to work, and the way your co-workers see you.”

FEATURED STORIES

The researchers conducted two distinct experiments involving a total of 351 employees, who over a period of ten days took time to note all of the things for which they were grateful. On completion of these exercises, participants were considerably less likely to report incidents of rudeness or ostracizing and gossipy behaviors in the workplace.

“Gratitude exercises are becoming increasingly popular products to improve employee attitudes and well-being, and our study shows managers can also use them to foster more respectful behavior in their teams,” point out the researchers. NVG

RELATED STORIES:

Ashamed of being a jealous friend? Researchers finds that it’s not necessarily a bad thing

Do we need religion to be moral? The answer depends on where you live, new report finds

TOPICS: gratitude, journal, positivity, Psychology, Workplace
Read Next
Don't miss out on the latest news and information.

Subscribe to INQUIRER PLUS to get access to The Philippine Daily Inquirer & other 70+ titles, share up to 5 gadgets, listen to the news, download as early as 4am & share articles on social media. Call 896 6000.

For feedback, complaints, or inquiries, contact us.


© Copyright 1997-2021 INQUIRER.net | All Rights Reserved

We use cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. By continuing, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. To find out more, please click this link.