outbrain
Close  

NSA building ‘quantum computer,’ says Washington Post

/ 05:47 AM January 04, 2014

This file photo provided by The Guardian Newspaper in London shows National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden in Hong Kong. The US National Security Agency is making strides toward building a “quantum computer” that could break nearly any kind of encryption, The Washington Post reported on Thursday, citing leaked documents from fugitive ex-NSA contractor Edward Snowden. AP PHOTO/THE GUARDIAN, GLENN GREENWALD AND LAURA POITRAS

WASHINGTON—The US National Security Agency (NSA) is making strides toward building a “quantum computer” that could break nearly any kind of encryption, The Washington Post reported on Thursday.

The Post said leaked documents from fugitive ex-NSA contractor Edward Snowden indicated the computer would allow the secret intelligence agency to break encryption used to protect banking, medical, business and government records around the world.

ADVERTISEMENT

Quantum computing has been a goal among commercial firms, such as IBM, because it can harness the power of atoms and molecules, vastly increasing speed and security of computers and other devices.

But experts cited by the newspaper said it was unlikely that the NSA would be close to creating such a machine without the scientific community being aware of it.

FEATURED STORIES

Improbable

“It seems improbable that the NSA could be that far ahead of the open world without anybody knowing it,” Scott Aaronson of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology told the daily.

The NSA declined to comment on the report.

The Post said the leaked documents indicated that the agency carries out research in large, shielded rooms known as Faraday cages designed to prevent electromagnetic energy from entering or exiting.

Encryption breaker

Because of its vast computing power, a working quantum computer would break the strongest encryption tools in use today for online activities, including banking and e-mails.

Some technology firms, such as Google and Yahoo!, have said in recent weeks that they were stepping up efforts to encrypt their communications following reports that the NSA had been able to break or circumvent many of the current encryption standards.

ADVERTISEMENT

A September report by The New York Times, ProPublica and The Guardian, also based on leaked documents, said US and British spy agencies were able to decipher data even with the supposedly secure encryption to make it private.

The documents indicated that the NSA, working with its British counterpart, Government Communications Headquarters, accomplished the feat by using supercomputers, court orders and some cooperation from technology companies.

Defeating security

If the reports are accurate, the highly secretive program would defeat much of what is used to keep data secure and private on the Internet, from

e-mails to chats to communications using smartphones.

IBM researchers said last year they had made advances in quantum computing that has the potential to outperform any existing supercomputer.

The new type of computing uses information encoded into quantum bits or qubits, putting into use a theory that scientists have been discussing for decades.

Quantum computing expands on the most basic piece of information that a typical computer understands—a bit—and thereby can perform millions of calculations at once.

TOPICS: Edward Snowden, National Security Agency, quantum computer, technology, US, Washington Post
Read Next
EDITORS' PICK
MOST READ
Don't miss out on the latest news and information.
View comments

Subscribe to INQUIRER PLUS to get access to The Philippine Daily Inquirer & other 70+ titles, share up to 5 gadgets, listen to the news, download as early as 4am & share articles on social media. Call 896 6000.

For feedback, complaints, or inquiries, contact us.


© Copyright 1997-2020 INQUIRER.net | All Rights Reserved

We use cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. By continuing, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. To find out more, please click this link.