Close  

WATCH: Footage of rare ‘seven-armed’ octopus caught by scientists

/ 07:11 PM April 05, 2017

The marine animal octopus is perhaps best known  for the eight functioning tentacles attached to its body.

ADVERTISEMENT

But one elusive species, the seven-armed octopus Haliphron atlanticus, was finally caught on tape by marine biologists from the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) in Moss Landing, California, USA.

As seen in a clip uploaded on YouTube recently, the mysterious cephalopod—which is rarely documented alive by scientists—is snacking on a jellyfish.

“It looked as though Haliphron had not only made a meal of the jelly, but was hanging onto it, perhaps for defense or for help in catching prey,” the aquarium’s YouTube description said.

Furthermore, the aquarium also revealed that it’s only the third time in 27 years that the ambiguous creature was sighted.

“This species is rarely seen alive, and most  of what is known about it came from specimens caught in trawl nets,” the group said.

The “septipus” is one of the two largest-known species of octopus,  and could grow to as long as 12 feet. In reality, the animal actually has eight arms, but one is coiled in a sac beneath the right eye and is easily overlooked by the naked eye.  Khristian Ibarrola /ra

RELATED STORY:

WATCH: Extremely rare ‘ghost shark’ first time caught on cam

ADVERTISEMENT
TOPICS: 7-armed octopus, Haliphron atlanticu, Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, Youtube
LATEST STORIES
MOST READ
Don't miss out on the latest news and information.
View comments

Subscribe to INQUIRER PLUS to get access to The Philippine Daily Inquirer & other 70+ titles, share up to 5 gadgets, listen to the news, download as early as 4am & share articles on social media. Call 896 6000.

For feedback, complaints, or inquiries, contact us.


© Copyright 1997-2019 INQUIRER.net | All Rights Reserved

We use cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. By continuing, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. To find out more, please click this link.