outbrain
Close  

iPhones of the future may no longer include Touch ID, predicts expert

/ 12:12 PM October 16, 2017

iPhone X Face ID. Image: Apple official website

Future iPhones may no longer have Touch ID fingerprint sensors as part of their features.

According to a report on MacRumors, KGI Securities analyst Ming-Chi Kuo predicted that Face ID would be Apple’s new trump card over Android smartphone competitors.

ADVERTISEMENT

Kuo predicts the company would leverage the technological advantage of the TrueDepth camera system when it comes to 3D sensing design and production.

On the flip side, a previous report by KGI stated that the Face ID feature would become a major bottleneck in the production of iPhone Xs. They predicted 30 million to 35 million iPhone X units would be shipped in 2017, a step down from an earlier estimate of 40 million.

FEATURED STORIES

Apple software engineering chief Craig Federighi also hinted that the company may not be ready to fully transition away from fingerprint authentication just yet. This means some iPhones released in 2018 may still be equipped with Touch ID authentication.

Ultimately, KGI believes the push for Face ID would put pressure on Android smartphone makers to adopt 3D sensing facial recognition on their own devices. Under-display optical fingerprint recognition might just become a thing of the past. Alfred Bayle/JB

RELATED STORIES:

iPhone X 2.5 years ahead of Android, thanks to TrueDepth Camera, says analyst

iPhone X may earn Samsung more money than Galaxy S8 — report

Smartphones from 2018 and beyond could all be carrying AI chips

ADVERTISEMENT
TOPICS: 3D sensing, Face ID, face recognition, fingerprint scanner, iPhone X, KGI Securities, Ming-Cho Kuo, Touch ID
Read Next
EDITORS' PICK
MOST READ
Don't miss out on the latest news and information.
View comments

Subscribe to INQUIRER PLUS to get access to The Philippine Daily Inquirer & other 70+ titles, share up to 5 gadgets, listen to the news, download as early as 4am & share articles on social media. Call 896 6000.

For feedback, complaints, or inquiries, contact us.


© Copyright 1997-2020 INQUIRER.net | All Rights Reserved

We use cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. By continuing, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. To find out more, please click this link.