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DOJ starts crafting implementing rules for Cybercrime Prevention Act

/ 04:39 PM March 11, 2014

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MANILA, Philippines – The Department of Justice (DOJ) and other concerned agencies already started crafting the implementing rules and regulations  (IRR) for the Cybercrime Prevention Act, a month after the Supreme Court declared most of its provisions as constitutional.

“In keeping with our mandate under the law, the DOJ is initiating this much awaited IRR to clarify how government will proceed with the enforcement of cybercrime legislation,” Justice Secretary Leila De Lima said.

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“The IRR should be straightforward and comprehensive that stakeholders are guided and the only thing that our law enforcers will do is to implement it,” she said.

Aside from the DOJ, members of the group include the Information and Communications Technology Office of the Department of the Interior and Local Government (DILG).

Among the laws that will be harmonized with Republic Act 10175 are the Access Devices Regulation Act of 1998, E-Commerce Act of 2000, Anti-Child Pornography Act of 2009 and Anti-Photo and Voyeurism Act of 2009.

The next round of consultations will include “key partners” from business, media, academe and technology companies, said Assistant Secretary Geronimo Sy, head of the DOJ Office of Cybercrime.

Section 28 of the law allows for 90 days for the IRR to be promulgated from its enactment or in this case, from the finality of the Supreme Court’s decision.

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TOPICS: Cybercrime law, infotech, News
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